Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Original Batman Comic Strip

The early Batman newspaper strips seem to be kind of scarce. This dates from 1944, the second year of the strip. Practically everything signed by creator Bob Kane was ghosted, and this was probably drawn by eitheDick Sprang, Jack Burnley, Charles Paris or Alvin Schwartz.
Click to Supersize

5 comments:

  1. Very cool, and nice to see.

    My theory on why they're scarce is, they're kind of a bastard child. Comic book readers aren't great fans of comic strips and comic strip collectors tend to gravitate more toward strips that are not adaptations of something, but rather created specifically for that medium.

    I am a fan of both, but still view comic book adaptaions in strip form in lower regard-and vice versa. But now almost 70 years later, these have a special charm to them that I appreciate.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This may have been written by Schwartz, actually. He did a great run of Batman from i think 43-46. He also wrote the Superman strip in it's earliset days, which is where he cooked up Bizarro.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is great, thanks! What is the significance of the line 3/4 down the panels? Is that where it might be cropped in some papers?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hey, Ed... Yeah, it is my understanding that some paper cropped the strips at that size.

    Brad, you must have Brainiac knowledge of these things. That's interesting to find out that the comic strip contributed Brainiac. Like Jeff said, nowadays the comic strips are considered the red-headed step-child of the comic books... probably because things are more valuable when the creators are attached to a comic strip.

    I'd agree with you, Jeff, on your hypothesis. I think there are smatterings of cool stuff in there, like you mentioned with this Batman strip. I imagine the earliest Superman strips were the same way. And when John Romita was drawing Spider-man, I wouldn't miss it... it was one of the best strips of its day, I thought.

    ReplyDelete
  5. That strip was actually drawn by Bob Kane. He pencilled the daily strip for most of its run. Inks by Charlie Paris.

    ReplyDelete